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I think I can, I think I can...

Frequently Asked Question’s

  1. Do Babies understand when we talk to them?
  2. Can a parent tell whether a child's speech is developing well?
  3. Can a smart child have a speech or language problem?
  4. Should I wait until my child starts school to seek help with speech and language problems?
  5. Is it common for younger children in families not to talk?
  6. Will my child grow out of a speech and language problem?
  7. If we speak more that one language at home, will it cause our child to have a speech or language problem?
  8. Do I need a doctor’s referral to have my child seen by "Talking Tots"?
  9. Should I worry if my child stutters?


#5 Is it common for younger children in families not to talk?

A child's place in the family usually has no bearing on speech and language development. Each child is unique and it is best not to compare one child with another. Sometimes, younger children will make themselves understood with gestures and noises instead of words or older children may speak for younger children. Parents need to encourage younger children to talk just as much as older children.

Adapted with permission from material developed by First Words Preschool Speech and Language Program of Ottawa-Carleton led by Pinecrest - Queensway Health and Community Services.